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Articles Archive for February 2014

Featured, Issue 039 Inspiration, Opinions »

[25 Feb 2014 | Comments Off on A “To Do List” for Uganda’s Creative Cultural Sector | ]
A “To Do List” for Uganda’s Creative Cultural Sector

Opinion piece by Faisal Kiwewa

The current state of Uganda’s creative cultural sector is far more vibrant and visible than what generations in the past have ever seen.

It is today that we see the youth coming together to realize their creative ideas and express themselves through different art forms; we see individuals passionately embracing talent with a pure mind that art is not a joke, rather a profession. A piece of this momentum is in new arts organisations that are forging […]

Editorial Notes, Featured, Issue 039 Inspiration »

[24 Feb 2014 | Comments Off on Issue 039 Inspiration | ]
Issue 039 Inspiration

Issue 39 of Start Journal intends to use the online platform as a space to inspire.

Featured, Issue 038 Education, Special analysis »

[23 Feb 2014 | Comments Off on Teaching Art Against the Norm | ]
Teaching Art Against the Norm

In the art room of Greenhill Academy Secondary school in Kampala, students have been transformed from carrying just a pencil and sketchpad to textbooks and notebooks. For most of these students art was never theoretical, now they are pushed to research and write essays on the subjects of Renaissance art and Greek and Roman architecture.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Issue 038 Education, Special analysis »

[5 Feb 2014 | Comments Off on Students and Masters | ]
Students and Masters

By Eria Nsubuga

 

Twelve students from Nkumba University’s School of Commercial Industrial Art and Design (SCIAD) collaborated to produce a piece inspired by European masters. How did they choose the Picasso and van Gogh? As their supervisor, I tasked them with making a fusion composition of Picasso’s Girl Before a Mirror, Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers and Botticelli’s’ The birth of Venus. These iconic works are in their own right a daunting project, but trying to put three distinct philosophies together was […]