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[25 May 2015 | Comments Off on Thank you for your support, we are almost there! | ]
Thank you for your support, we are almost there!

Help Startjournal reach its fundraising goals as we count down the days from the start the of StartJournal Fundraising Campaign until it will end on the 31st of May. We are most grateful to people like you who make our work and the journal possible through your support. Your money not only provides young writers the opportunity to write about the arts, it also supports the documenting of East African and African Art, archives what is happening in the art scene and keeps our website updated & online.

Featured, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[15 Apr 2015 | Comments Off on Inspired by Western Modern Art | ]
Inspired by Western Modern Art

Eria Sane Nsubuga an academic at Christian University Mukono in the department of Fine Arts, says that referring to the work of others shows an awareness of self and others. “It is therefore natural given the residual western political and educational set up for African artists to refer to the work of the European masters that we saw in the Art History books. Incidentally those same books as a matter of design more than accident, said nothing about our own indigenous art.” he quotes in his essay, ‘Dead men tell no tales’.

Collaborative Art Project, Ekifananyi project, Featured, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[11 Mar 2015 | Comments Off on Images, Reflections, Objects | ]
Images, Reflections, Objects

I was impressed, both in the affirmative and negative senses by the calculated way that racist philosophy is engrained in European culture.
Images of 2 dimensional photography, paint, paper, cloth; objects in 3 dimension, and audio-visual media have been used to project a consistent image of us. We put our work up in the subliminal awareness of the fact that our work, by virtual of being Ugandan or African and is telling a Ugandan story to an audience that has long held views of what Africa is or should be. My mission became not only to tell a Ugandan story but also to try and challenge the way that African stories are portrayed. Consistently I have desired to discuss ‘Race’, ‘colour’, ‘object’, ‘ekifananyi’, ‘image’ not in the mirrored way of showing ‘contemporary African art’ but also to show our art images and objects as needing liberation just as much as we do.

Featured, Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts, Review, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[18 Feb 2015 | 2 Comments | ]
Atwork in progress

From February 9th to the 13th 2015, 21 fine art students, curators-to-be, and recent graduates participated in the AtWork workshop, equipped with two small moleskine notebooks. One book was reserved for ideas, question, and notes and the second for executing their interpretation to the question, “should I take off my shoes?” They worked under the direction of Simon Njami, with the support of Dr. Lillian Nabulime and Dr. George Kyeyune from the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Special analysis »

[3 Feb 2015 | Comments Off on Demystifying African art Primitivism on Global art scene | ]
Demystifying African art Primitivism on Global art scene

The debate whether African art belongs in Global Exhibitions is one that dominates many art forums across the continent and beyond today. Artists, in a bid to assert their position in this era of globalization and emerge as international citizens have continuously produced artworks that tackle global themes like Environmental conservation, Recycling, Consumption , Material culture, Corruption, Gender & Sexuality and Feminism.

Featured, Opinions, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[28 Jan 2015 | 3 Comments | ]
Music to the ears

Recently I was listening to this ballad by Fela Anikulapo Kuti where he asserted that it is in the Western cultural tradition to carry sh*t. That Africans were taught by European man to carry sh*t. Dem go cause confusion and corruption’. How? Dem get one style dem use, dem go pick up one African man with low mentality and give him 1 million Naira bread to become one useless chief.
Artist Henry Mzili Mujunga speaks his mind about interference within the art scene in Africa.

Featured, Issue 044 - KLA ART 14, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[20 Nov 2014 | Comments Off on Mapping Kampala with KLA ART 014 | ]
Mapping Kampala with KLA ART 014

By Elizabeth Namakula
KLA ART 014 was a far cry from the sophisticated and outdoor festival of 2012. The two festivals showed a progression from neat and tidy exhibits within shipping containers to multi layered commentary on informal living.
This year’s festival included contemporary artists from Uganda and Uganda’s neighbouring countries, exploring the theme Unmapped, and asking the question, who are the unheard voices of our cities and how can the unseen urban dwellers be represented and celebrated?

In the Gallery

Strips of coloured […]

Featured, Issue 044 - KLA ART 14, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[15 Nov 2014 | Comments Off on Photo Currency: Images of Kampala’s Unmapped | ]
Photo Currency: Images of Kampala’s Unmapped

The bodaboda project manifests the “unmapped” theme by bridging the gap between its audience and the artwork. It achieves this by taking public art to the public. Participating artist, Papa Shabani shared his excitement about the opportunity to interact with people and to have his art be part of a unique experience that has been relished by the public.

Issue 043 Bayimba International Festival of the Arts, Special analysis »

[11 Oct 2014 | Comments Off on Bayimba Comes of Age | ]
Bayimba Comes of Age

When programming, we extensively discuss how you, our audience would experience the festival, the final product. “However programming our annual festival is a creative process, of equal importance as the final product in itself. It is a process of experimenting and exploring, in close consultation and cooperation with both artists and partners we select.”

Bayimba, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis »

[10 Aug 2014 | Comments Off on Bayimba – Mbale | ]
Bayimba – Mbale

The reduced numbers at the 2014 Eastern Regional drew a lot of comparison with previous festivals. This contrast could be made between last year’s performers and those of 2014, yet their disparity is not based on regional descent; rather, on popularity.

- Issue 042 Kampala Art Biennale, Featured, Headline, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[5 Aug 2014 | One Comment | ]
Africa, Kampala and the Irony of Progress

The biennale’s theme “Progressive Africa” is at once a mirror and a clarion call. It enables the organisers and participants to take a critical look at the past and face up to the future with renewed hope and enthusiasm. In other words, it straddles the past, present, and future in its philosophic and metaphoric essences.

Creative techniques, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis »

[5 Jul 2014 | Comments Off on The Lubare and The Boat: Alexander MacKay’s Spirit Rises at Deveron Arts | ]
The Lubare and The Boat: Alexander MacKay’s Spirit Rises at Deveron Arts

On the weekend of June 14-15, two contrasting cultures came together under the umbrella of art to celebrate the life and times of Scottish explorer and missionary Alexander MacKay, who devoted his life to journeying through Uganda. Ugandan artists Sanaa Gateja, Xenson, and art curator Violet Nantume joined forces with Deveron Arts in Rhynie, Scotland, for a two-day event filled with creative activities centred on cultural integration.

Bayimba, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis »

[1 Jul 2014 | Comments Off on Bayimba – Fort Portal | ]
Bayimba – Fort Portal

Nestled behind tea-matted hills with a reputation for cleanliness, Fort Portal is culturally self-contained, even resistant. For the success of the festival, Bayimba partnered intricately with the community to develop workshops, a brass band procession, a boda boda art exhibition.

32º East Writer in Residence, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[25 Jun 2014 | Comments Off on Finding Solace in the West | ]
Finding Solace in the West

As persistent pleas are made to artists to create art with local significance the artists are caught up in a web of conflicted interest. On the one hand, they want to break away from the mould of Western art history bestowed onto them by university art education.

32º East Writer in Residence, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[4 Jun 2014 | Comments Off on Swings and Roundabouts in Masaka | ]
Swings and Roundabouts in Masaka

The duo had a call from 32? East to “work in dialogue”. This involved the artists pushing boundaries of their art in the community and experimenting with a diversity of media and techniques.

32º East Writer in Residence, Creative techniques, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[1 Jun 2014 | Comments Off on From the Garbage Bin to Interactive Art | ]
From the Garbage Bin to Interactive Art

This collaboration between The Garbage Collectors project 2014 and Ugandan environmental artists is representative of socially conscious art. As such, it gives artists an opportunity to work with a variety of media and technique, at the same time extending their work to the public.

Featured, Issue 040 Gender & Sexuality, Literature, Special analysis »

[19 May 2014 | Comments Off on Telling our Stories – A review of Invisible: Stories from Kenya’s Queer Community | ]
Telling our Stories – A review of Invisible: Stories from Kenya’s Queer Community

By: Kampire Bahana

This petite and easy read is a testament to the importance of telling our own stories. We usually talk about this in reference to being African; outsiders have been telling our stories since before the days of Heart of Darkness, a book published more than a hundred years ago that continues to define the continent in the minds of many. Today we have movie stars like George Clooney, Angelina Jolie and Ben Affleck, testifying in front of American […]

Bayimba, Music, Special analysis »

[30 Apr 2014 | Comments Off on Bayimba – Gulu | ]
Bayimba – Gulu

Bayimba Gulu was dynamic and full of culture. Raymond Omerio Ojakol was there to cover it.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Issue 040 Gender & Sexuality, Special analysis »

[29 Apr 2014 | Comments Off on Double Lives, No Future | ]
Double Lives, No Future

The philosophy of Double Lives is clear: when two planes of the mind are combined a third plane emerges — reconditioning identity.

Featured, Issue 040 Gender & Sexuality, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[20 Apr 2014 | Comments Off on Britain Loves Africa: Portraits of Culture and Intimacy | ]
Britain Loves Africa: Portraits of Culture and Intimacy

The photographic project Britain Loves Africa by Campbell attempts to give viewers a domestic insight into the homes of couples living in East Africa of whom one partner is British and the other African. With these images she raises a subject that would normally be informally explored, in conversation or gossip, and given it a platform for public debate.