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Articles in the Visual Art Category

Artwork critiques, Issue 023 Aug '12, Visual Art »

[4 Aug 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Ronex celebrating his 10 yrs: New faces + new directions

Is it Art or Wolokoso? was the theme of Ronex’s art exhibition of 10 Years, questioning a fundamental theory that Ugandans do not “get” art. By the end of the four staged exhibits in four galleries, each two weeks apart, several of the showgoers agreed gleefully that what they had experienced was indeed, art. Serubiri Moses reviews for Startjournal.

Issue 023 Aug '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[4 Aug 2012 | 5 Comments | ]
Uganda’s Independence Monuments at 50

Perhaps one day Ugandan artists and citizens will honor Maloba and his vision by reappropriating Independence Monument from its current appropriation, even theft, by the NRM as a rallying place for reflection on the 50 years of betrayals of the original promise of independence. Armed with the social media that Ugandan artists utilize so effectively, they may give birth to a new generation of promise to transform Uganda. What will their monuments, the monuments for the next 50 years of independence, look like?

Artist interviews, Issue 022 July '12, Visual Art »

[2 Jul 2012 | 4 Comments | ]
Chris Mugarura: The present and future of Ugandan comics industry

Chris Mugarura is a Ugandan comics artist, striving hard to enrich the comics industry and trying to change people’s stereotypical perceptions towards comics. He believes he can do this through his masterful comics skills and compilations.

Issue 022 July '12, Opinions, Visual Art »

[2 Jul 2012 | Comments Off on Curving a niche in social transformation through Art | ]
Curving a niche in social transformation through Art

Ugandan visual artists want to help the slum-dwelling communities of Kampala to express their views artistically. Through creative media like painting, sculpture and printmaking the artists hope to start a dialogue on issues that affect the communities. Nathan Kiwere of the Uganda Visual Artists Association explains the slum art project.

Artwork critiques, Issue 021 Jun '12, Visual Art »

[30 May 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Felix Magima: Just the eyes

Felix Magima confronts two important, though rarely addressed, subjects in his recent exhibition at the AKA Gallery; women and religion. As his artworks speak, they often wade into taboo territories, therefore observing a new place, rarely approached by visual artists in Uganda. His new paintings “scream out” for freedom for women and the poor enslaved by religious commercialism. Serubiri Moses reviews for Startjournal.

Artist interviews, Issue 020 May '12, Visual Art »

[30 Apr 2012 | 7 Comments | ]
Bruno Ruganzu: Winner of the TED Prize City 2.0 in Doha

On 17th April 2012, in Doha, Bruno Ruganzu was announced winner of the TEDx competition TED Prize for City 2.0 at the TEDx Summit in Qatar. City 2.0 is about creating ideas that can change your city. Innovation, education, culture and economic opportunity were its key fundamentals. Among the five finalists from Egypt, Canada, South Africa and Pakistani, Bruno had only two minutes to raise the Ugandan flag high.

Artwork critiques, Issue 020 May '12, Visual Art »

[30 Apr 2012 | One Comment | ]
Edison Mugalu’s art: The serendipity of success

“I have been following the trends in Uganda’s visual environment in the last decade, with keen interest and I have noted something rather distinct. While the events in art that made headlines in the period of economic recovery (1986-2000) were led by seasoned artists with predictable results, those in the last decade have been dominated by younger artists most of whom in the early stages of their careers. … Edison Mugalu typifies this cadre of younger artists who have taken to making art as their full time employment and many have made a success of it. Their work exhibit a bold and aggressive attitude which is also reflected in their marketing strategies.” Professor George Kyeyune reviews Mugalu’s work for startjournal.

Creative techniques, Issue 020 May '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[30 Apr 2012 | One Comment | ]
Arts and Heritage: Who owns what? Why we have to (be) care(fully)?

In the world of arts and culture nowadays, the term ‘heritage’ seems to be everywhere. Every country has its National Heritage, Tourist Guides are advertising World Heritage, and so on. If someone referrs to ‘heritage’, is it about preserving traditional knowlegde or is it about making money? What is this ‘heritage’ all about? Does an artist inherit something? Or a people?

Issue 019 Apr '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[30 Mar 2012 | 6 Comments | ]
Turning Trash into Treasure

A city flooded with litter is great news for the creatives. Artists should look for waste materials in their immediate surroundings, take advantage of the built-in shapes, colours and textures of ordinary rubbish, and treat the piles of litter as a main source of inspiration. These were some of the messages delivered by some of Uganda’s finest artists at the first TEDx-conference hosted in Kampala.

Artwork critiques, Issue 019 Apr '12, Visual Art »

[30 Mar 2012 | Comments Off on Olubugo Reloaded: The push towards a new awareness | ]
Olubugo Reloaded: The push towards a new awareness

The exhibition ‘Olubugo Reloaded’ at FAS FAS Gallery is important because it presents artworks based on the bark cloth material with a focus on what place it has in Uganda and within the contemporary arts of Uganda. Art lecturer in fibers and weaving, Lesli Robertson of the University of North Texas, continues to see that bark cloth is finding stronger ground every year and it is through the work of Ugandan artists and designers that this material continues to elevate its place within contemporary art.

Art collectors, Artist interviews, Issue 019 Apr '12, Visual Art »

[30 Mar 2012 | 3 Comments | ]
History In Progress: Ugandan photo opportunities

Uganda, the state, will be 50 years old on October 9. That is the history book record. However, a private photo collection that started life as a Facebook archive venture is challenging that version of events. Most times, unintentionally. By the simple act of dredging up visual records from 100 years ago of life in the area that is now geographically registered as Uganda, History in Progress Uganda (HIP) is forcing a re-think of what it means to be Ugandan and where Uganda come from.

Artwork critiques, Issue 019 Apr '12, Visual Art »

[30 Mar 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Different But One 16: A Story without End

“Different But One, for the last fifteen years, has provided artists a platform for visual artistic expressions that are increasingly dynamic and provocative. This annual event has also given artists the chance to continually keep their talent alive. This year’s Different But One had a visual exuberance to me which led me to compare it to the “jumping the broom” ceremony; a joyful entry into a new life together as artists—male and female, old and young, modern and figurative, abstract and narrative. We, the viewers, are participants of the renewed energy and commitment of Makerere Faculty’s vision and fine arts.” Maria Alawua reviews.

Artist interviews, Dance and Theatre, Issue 018 Mar '12, Music, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[29 Feb 2012 | 3 Comments | ]
Outlook 2012: Six leading Ugandan arts and culture professionals share their visions

Faisal Kiwewa, Director of Bayimba Cultural Foundation, Adong Judith Lucy, a renowned playwright, film maker and arts practitioner, John Bosco Kyabaggu, production manager at the Uganda National Cultural Centre, Ronex Ahimbisibwe, a renowned visual artist, Maurice Kirya, musician and brainchild of the Maurice Kirya Experience, and Joel Sebunjo, acclaimed Ugandan world music artist, all share some thoughts about 2011 and 2012.

Artwork critiques, Issue 018 Mar '12, Visual Art »

[29 Feb 2012 | Comments Off on Jjuuko Hoods’ visual memoir of Kampala today | ]
Jjuuko Hoods’ visual memoir of Kampala today

It took Jjuuko Hoods, one of Uganda’s most productive, self-motivated and energetic artists, two years of soul-searching, looking back at his past artistic achievements and experiences, to acknowledge that a turn-away from the contemporary mainstream crowd of artists’ was not an option to be debated about, but a must to be acted upon. Maria Alawua reviews Jjuuko’s latest exhibition.

Artwork critiques, Issue 018 Mar '12, Visual Art »

[15 Feb 2012 | One Comment | ]
The 100 Posters for the Right to Education Exhibition: Its Lessons for the Enforcement of Fundamental Rights

Between 8 December 2011 and 8 January 2012 the Institute of Heritage Conservation and Restoration hosted the 100 Posters for the Right to Education Exhibition to celebrate the International Human Rights Day. In this essay Dr. Angelo Kakande analyse a selection of posters to expose the visual and legal issues behind the right to education in Uganda and the point at which the exhibition intersected with this right.

Issue 017 Feb '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[30 Jan 2012 | 5 Comments | ]
Creativity, innovation and experimentation sets a new pace for the Ugandan visual arts

“With a host of art spaces and projects springing up, all designed to foster creativity, innovation and experimentation of the arts, and extending art to the local people, art in Uganda is evolving in a new direction.” Dominic Muwanguzi has visited Weaver Bird Arts Community, Fasfas Art Café, 32° East and more new art venues.

Artist interviews, Creative techniques, Issue 017 Feb '12, Visual Art »

[30 Jan 2012 | 5 Comments | ]
Behind the Artwork: Joseph Ntensibe’s ‘Disappearing Forests’

Next out in the category the Story Behind an Artwork, we have interviewed one of the leading contemporary Ugandan artists, Joseph Ntsensibe, about his work ‘Disappearing Forests’ (2011). Read about why and how Ntensibe created this one piece of art which responds to the topic ‘environmental protection’.

Artwork critiques, Issue 016 Jan '12, Visual Art »

[28 Dec 2011 | 2 Comments | ]
Geoffrey Mukasa: The enduring painter

“As an artist Geoffrey Mukasa was never afraid to take on new challenges; he taught us to be bold and courageous. He straddled the past and the present and his contribution to the young subject of contemporary art in Uganda has been immense. Mukasa stretched the borders of painting beyond the expected, and deservedly; today he is celebrated as a leading Ugandan painter of the 20th century who was key in raising the profile of art in Uganda. Mukasa’s legacy will continue to reverberate across the country and beyond for many years to come.” Dr. George Kyeyune reviews the recent Mukasa-exhibition at AKA Gallery (Tulifanya).

Artwork critiques, Issue 016 Jan '12, Music, Visual Art »

[28 Dec 2011 | One Comment | ]
This Is Uganda: Artwork in Progress

At this year’s This Is Uganda-festival young people shared ideas, promoted their artistic merchandise and learnt a thing or two about culture. Some came to see, some came to feel, other came to show off. There were simple art projects with global consequences, but was there a real message? Henry Mzili Mujunga reviews the arts and crafts at TIU 2011.

Issue 016 Jan '12, Opinions, Visual Art »

[28 Dec 2011 | 2 Comments | ]
East African Art Summit 2011: The coming together of creative minds

“The time has finally arrived that Africa begin to look to Africa for answers. We are starting to think about making East Africa our market place. But we can not go far without drastically improving the quality of our products. For too long we have made inefficient production schedules and products. On the other hand, a myriad of questions are raised to which answers cannot be immediately found. Still, these questions must be asked and answered if our art is to grow into the cultural void in which we find ourselves.” Ugandan visual artist SANE reflects on the East African Art Summit.