Home » Archive

Articles tagged with: 32º East

32º East Writer in Residence, Artwork critiques, Creative techniques, Review, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[3 Sep 2017 | One Comment | ]
Ife Piankhi: A Language and Grammar of Healing

By Erika Holum

Ife Piankhi is a recent artist in residence at 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust. Working as a performance artist, singer, poet, and creative facilitator for over 30 years, Ife has recently ventured into a creative practice where her craft has taken visual form through a textured, multi-media approach to papier mâché and collage work, and the creation of bright and colorful mandalas. The material and spiritual elements embedded within Ife’s work create a semiotic grammar and visual […]

Collaborative Art Project, Featured, New media, Visual Art »

[4 Aug 2017 | One Comment | ]
Ife Piankhi in Residence at 32° East

Ife Piankhi is a recent artist in residence at 32° East | Ugandan Arts Trust where she explored communal trauma, communal healing and identity through poetry, painting, woodwork and collage arts. Ife explored these themes and a variety of materials from May to July of 2017. She also hosted two community conversations to exchange stories and viewpoints concerning transatlantic slavery, personal stories of migration and where the possibilities for healing lie. A video by Nikissi Serumaga-Jamo.

Artist interviews, Featured, Headline, Uncategorized »

[11 Nov 2015 | Comments Off on Transcending the Proverbial box – Q&A with Jackie Karuti | ]
Transcending the Proverbial box – Q&A with Jackie Karuti

Jackie Karuti was born in Nairobi, Kenya, and has in recent years gained positive attention for her experimental, conceptual work using new media. She explores themes of death, sexuality, identity, space and urban culture using installation, video and performance art as well as mixed-media work. Karuti has exhibited and participated in workshops and residencies in Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sweden, The Netherlands, Uganda and the USA. She has also collaborated with other artists in various film, photography and academic […]

Featured, New media, Review »

[14 Oct 2015 | Comments Off on Glass mirrors Stacey Gillian’s triumphs and despair | ]
Glass mirrors Stacey Gillian’s triumphs and despair

By Samuel Kiwanuka

The Kampala contemporary art scene is increasingly becoming exciting. Artists’ niche to experiment and innovate with new media now facilitates them to convey different forms of visual narratives to their audiences through interaction with the artwork. By building installations in public space created from glass and mixed media, Stacey Gillian conjures a visual discourse that is both personal and intimate. The soft spoken artist’s works evolve around her personal experience of joy, triumph, pain and despair. She’s also […]

Featured, Uncategorized »

[17 Jun 2015 | Comments Off on Melancholy Exhibition, probes the pain of introspection and the joy of self-knowledge | ]
Melancholy Exhibition, probes the pain of introspection and the joy of self-knowledge

“All the time, whenever I would go to paint, there was this thing in me. I think the energy in the paintings would show there is some bit of soul-searching,” he said to me, drawing back his arms behind his head in a thoughtful pose. There it was. The spirit of Melancholy.

Collaborative Art Project, Featured, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[1 Jun 2015 | Comments Off on A Tree in Public Space | ]
A Tree in Public Space

In October 2014, a Mutuba or fig tree was the focus of intense debate during an art exhibition. The Mutuba grows across tropical Africa, and is farmed in Uganda for its use in the making of bark cloth. This centuries old tradition is both cultural and historical. Therefore, it is surprising that the debate at the time, between the KLA ART 014 exhibition organizers and the KCCA, Kampala Capital City Authority, involved a disagreement about where the tree would be planted.

Featured, Literature »

[1 Apr 2015 | Comments Off on Art writing encourages dialogue in the Arts | ]
Art writing encourages dialogue in the Arts

Last year in March, 32°East, a centre for contemporary arts in Uganda run a art writing residence for three months at their premises in Kansanga. The program co-sponsored by the British Council and Startjournal.org had one art writer, Dominic Muwanguzi, researching and producing articles that were published in the online journal.
Based from his experience from the residency, Muwanguzi a seasoned art journalist working in Kampala became more confident in his writing. For once, he became aware of the relationship that exists between writer, artist and audience.

Featured, Opinions, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[28 Jan 2015 | 3 Comments | ]
Music to the ears

Recently I was listening to this ballad by Fela Anikulapo Kuti where he asserted that it is in the Western cultural tradition to carry sh*t. That Africans were taught by European man to carry sh*t. Dem go cause confusion and corruption’. How? Dem get one style dem use, dem go pick up one African man with low mentality and give him 1 million Naira bread to become one useless chief.
Artist Henry Mzili Mujunga speaks his mind about interference within the art scene in Africa.

Creative techniques, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis »

[5 Jul 2014 | Comments Off on The Lubare and The Boat: Alexander MacKay’s Spirit Rises at Deveron Arts | ]
The Lubare and The Boat: Alexander MacKay’s Spirit Rises at Deveron Arts

On the weekend of June 14-15, two contrasting cultures came together under the umbrella of art to celebrate the life and times of Scottish explorer and missionary Alexander MacKay, who devoted his life to journeying through Uganda. Ugandan artists Sanaa Gateja, Xenson, and art curator Violet Nantume joined forces with Deveron Arts in Rhynie, Scotland, for a two-day event filled with creative activities centred on cultural integration.

32º East Writer in Residence, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[4 Jun 2014 | Comments Off on Swings and Roundabouts in Masaka | ]
Swings and Roundabouts in Masaka

The duo had a call from 32? East to “work in dialogue”. This involved the artists pushing boundaries of their art in the community and experimenting with a diversity of media and techniques.