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Articles tagged with: Makerere Art gallery

Artwork critiques, Featured, Uncategorized »

[26 Aug 2015 | Comments Off on George Kyeyune’s ‘Quiet Dignity’ repeats subject matter, pushes subtle boundaries | ]
George Kyeyune’s ‘Quiet Dignity’ repeats subject matter, pushes subtle boundaries

“It was at the beginning of the millennium, just before I went for my PhD that I started seriously painting,” Kyeyune narrated in an interview with the writer. In this time, he pursued painting in order to realise himself as an artist. However, like many others faced with the reality of living as an artist, he created more to sell than he created for himself. He confessed that his past exhibitions were not usually pre-meditated, but rather he was approached by gallery managers and owners to present his work regardless of whether or not the collection was cohesive.
“Quiet Dignity” was his escape from this trap. It was a planned exhibition toward which he worked with two goals: to present his findings on the use of modelling wax created from locally available materials and to re-launch himself into studio practice where he could create, not for a client, but for himself.

Featured, Review, Uncategorized »

[29 Jul 2015 | Comments Off on Constructions Exhibition bridges gap between Artists and Artisans | ]
Constructions Exhibition bridges gap between Artists and Artisans

Constructions, is bound into community practice and collaboration within a framework of socially engaged and participatory art and temporary practice. The culmination is a hybrid between exhibition, public installation and event created to reflect everyday contexts.

Featured, Uncategorized »

[17 Jun 2015 | Comments Off on Melancholy Exhibition, probes the pain of introspection and the joy of self-knowledge | ]
Melancholy Exhibition, probes the pain of introspection and the joy of self-knowledge

“All the time, whenever I would go to paint, there was this thing in me. I think the energy in the paintings would show there is some bit of soul-searching,” he said to me, drawing back his arms behind his head in a thoughtful pose. There it was. The spirit of Melancholy.

Featured, Special analysis »

[26 May 2015 | Comments Off on Ebishushani 2&3: Exhibition archiving Uganda’s history | ]
Ebishushani 2&3: Exhibition archiving Uganda’s history

A second photograph exhibition, Ebishushani 2&3 presented by History in Progress, Uganda at Makerere Art gallery imbues elements of documenting Uganda’s social-political landscape during the colonial and post-colonial regime, inviting dialogue on the significance of photography as a non-traditional art genre within the contemporary arts and creating an intelligent visual discourse that facilitates academic research in form of archive.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Uncategorized »

[5 May 2015 | Comments Off on Beautiful Imperfections: An exhibition of sculptures by Makerere Alumni | ]
Beautiful Imperfections: An exhibition of sculptures by Makerere Alumni

With Beautiful Imperfections, the artists continue a journey of both self and artistic exploration started when they were students of Margaret Trowell school of Fine art. Their choice to come back to exhibit here manifests the faith they have in the institution and an insatiable appetite to better themselves at every level of their artistry.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Special analysis »

[3 Feb 2015 | Comments Off on Demystifying African art Primitivism on Global art scene | ]
Demystifying African art Primitivism on Global art scene

The debate whether African art belongs in Global Exhibitions is one that dominates many art forums across the continent and beyond today. Artists, in a bid to assert their position in this era of globalization and emerge as international citizens have continuously produced artworks that tackle global themes like Environmental conservation, Recycling, Consumption , Material culture, Corruption, Gender & Sexuality and Feminism.

Featured, Issue 036 Sep-Oct '13, Uncategorized »

[31 Oct 2013 | One Comment | ]
Photography Set to Impress

It is not enough to recognise an arrival of craft — there must be a push to improve or a platform for debate. The result: practiced notions of process and evolution emerged within a thoughtfully curated exhibition space.

Artwork critiques, Issue 032 May '13, Visual Art »

[30 Apr 2013 | One Comment | ]
The Ernst May Exhibition at the Uganda Museum

KCCA’s struggle to transform Kampala into an international city has not been without its squabbles. The December altercations involving the business community in Centenary Park and KCCA went almost viral. Against such a background came the Ernst May Exhibition on 9th April this year at the Uganda Museum. It was organized by the Germany Embassy and designed as a tribute to the rapidly expanding and modernizing city of Kampala.

Artwork critiques, Issue 032 May '13, Visual Art »

[22 Apr 2013 | 3 Comments | ]
Sketching a Civilisation: Graphic records of unfinished ideas

“The very images themselves are still under construction — as rapidly as a freehand drawing — because each time someone sees one, s/he will add something, omit another thing, and form a memory that they will continue to work on in their minds. This is how we are all not the same. We don’t even see the same thing when looking at the same picture.” Ishta Nandi reviews the exhibition of Rumanzi Canon and Andrea Stultiens at Makerere Art Gallery.

Issue 029 Feb '13, Upcoming events, Visual Art »

[16 Jan 2013 | 3 Comments | ]
Using art to help communities: The Benet Story

What do you do as a minority community in a greater Uganda when you find yourself landless and your heritage about to be extinguished? The Benet people, high up on mount Elgon in the district of Kapchorwa, have chosen to tackle their fight for recognition and preservation of culture through art, being helped by two Dutch artists, Arno Peeters and Iris Honderdos. The exhibition ROOTED opens at Makerere Art Gallery Jan 18 2013.

Artwork critiques, Issue 027 Dec '12, Visual Art »

[30 Nov 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Expanding Africa’s story through photojournalism

The Uganda Press Photo Award (UPPA) ceremony, held November 8th, gave a unique platform to tell a multitude of stories through photographs, in doing so changing the role of photojournalism to both viewers and participants. Serubiri Moses reviews the exhibition and writes about the practice of photojournalism.

Issue 027 Dec '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[30 Nov 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Ugandan Art: From Galleries to Green Lawns and Red Roads

Do you want to learn about the development of the Ugandan Visual Arts scene? In this article, Margaret Nagawa starts with the impact of Margaret Trowell and Cecil Todd, and gives a brief overview of some of the developments in the art scene all the way up to the recent KLA ART 012.

Artwork critiques, Issue 026 Nov '12, Visual Art »

[2 Nov 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Kampala Contemporary Art Festival: Setting new trends in art exhibitions

“It had never occurred to me that setting up twelve shipping containers across the city could account for a festival, but it certainly did when the shipping containers were translated into art exhibition points. This was the Kampala Contemporary Art Festival dubbed ‘12 artists, 12 locations’ and it ran from 7th-14th October with a theme ‘12 Boxes Moving’.” Elizabeth Namakula reviews.

Issue 025 Oct '12, Upcoming events, Visual Art »

[16 Sep 2012 | Comments Off on Visionary Africa – Art at Work: Itinerant exhibition platform in African capitals | ]
Visionary Africa – Art at Work: Itinerant exhibition platform in African capitals

September 19-October 14, 2012, Kampala Railway Station Gardens

This project includes an itinerant urban exhibition of contemporary African artistic practices, residencies for African artists, and workshops on the relation between art and the development of modern urban centres in Africa. One of its aims is to highlight the importance of culture and creativity as development tools. This initiative is part of the strategic partnership between the EU and the African Union.

Artwork critiques, Issue 019 Apr '12, Visual Art »

[30 Mar 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Different But One 16: A Story without End

“Different But One, for the last fifteen years, has provided artists a platform for visual artistic expressions that are increasingly dynamic and provocative. This annual event has also given artists the chance to continually keep their talent alive. This year’s Different But One had a visual exuberance to me which led me to compare it to the “jumping the broom” ceremony; a joyful entry into a new life together as artists—male and female, old and young, modern and figurative, abstract and narrative. We, the viewers, are participants of the renewed energy and commitment of Makerere Faculty’s vision and fine arts.” Maria Alawua reviews.

Artwork critiques, Issue 018 Mar '12, Visual Art »

[15 Feb 2012 | One Comment | ]
The 100 Posters for the Right to Education Exhibition: Its Lessons for the Enforcement of Fundamental Rights

Between 8 December 2011 and 8 January 2012 the Institute of Heritage Conservation and Restoration hosted the 100 Posters for the Right to Education Exhibition to celebrate the International Human Rights Day. In this essay Dr. Angelo Kakande analyse a selection of posters to expose the visual and legal issues behind the right to education in Uganda and the point at which the exhibition intersected with this right.

Issue 017 Feb '12, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[30 Jan 2012 | 5 Comments | ]
Creativity, innovation and experimentation sets a new pace for the Ugandan visual arts

“With a host of art spaces and projects springing up, all designed to foster creativity, innovation and experimentation of the arts, and extending art to the local people, art in Uganda is evolving in a new direction.” Dominic Muwanguzi has visited Weaver Bird Arts Community, Fasfas Art Café, 32° East and more new art venues.

Artwork critiques, Issue 015 Dec '11, Visual Art »

[29 Nov 2011 | 5 Comments | ]
Great Achievements by Makerere Ceramists

Ceramics is a cultural tradition with millennia of history, and the ceramics show that opened on November 4th at the Makerere University Art gallery was about breaking old barriers and pushing back new ones. Combined with a flair for suspension, it was bolder and even more exciting than the last ceramics exhibition at the same venue.

Artwork critiques, Issue 013 Oct '11, Visual Art »

[2 Oct 2011 | 2 Comments | ]
Sculptural figures reflected on daily experiences? Nabulime confronts the canon of visual representation

In this essay Angelo Kakande F.J. reviews the themes of woman and man as visualised in Lilian Nabulime’s recent exhibition ‘Sculptural figures reflected on daily experiences’. He shows how a creative enterprise, shaped by formal art education, is interwoven into specific historical circumstances. He submits that through her sculptures Nabulime attempts to challenge masculine power.

Artwork critiques, Issue 011 July '11, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[4 Jul 2011 | Comments Off on Contemplating the Early Years Exhibition, Moving Past Propaganda: A Critical Review | ]
Contemplating the Early Years Exhibition, Moving Past Propaganda: A Critical Review

In this essay Dr. Angelo Kakande reviews The Early Years: Paintings from the Collection, 1960s-Mid 1980. He places it in Uganda’s history since 1958. In the process he revises some of the positions taken by its organisers; while he questions others. He demonstrates and argues that a contemplation of the wider context of Uganda’s social, economic and political history, which is embodied in some of the works on show, reveals not simply a failed past, but also a pathetic presence and an uncertain political future.