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Articles in the Review Category

Artist interviews, Artwork critiques, Featured, Film, Review, Special analysis »

[5 Apr 2017 | No Comment | ]
Mira Nair and the making of Queen of Katwe

By Kalungi Kabuye

Before Queen of Katwe, Mira Nair was probably better known as the director of the 1988 film Salaam Bombay, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. In Uganda we first knew her for Mississippi Masala (1991), a story of an Indian girl whose family had to leave Uganda because of (their deportation by) then President Idi Amin. It was the first major film in Uganda’s modern history to be filmed in Uganda, and […]

Editorial Notes, Featured, Review, Special analysis »

[3 Apr 2017 | No Comment | ]
Editorial: Returning to the archive: It is still rich, accessible and usable!

This issue demonstrates that the available archive of the history of Uganda’s visual culture is still rich, accessible and usable. However, it could shape a conversation on the country’s creative discourse if (and only if) we looked at it again and looked at it hard enough. Dr. Angello Kakande gives an overview of the articles in this Feb – May 2017 Issue.

Featured, Opinions, Review, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[14 Dec 2016 | Comments Off on On the Role of Curatorial Assistant, Kampala Art Biennale 2016 | ]
On the Role of Curatorial Assistant, Kampala Art Biennale 2016

By Martha Kazungu. In August 2016, during a meeting where I was invited to be part of the team to share ideas on how to re-establish and run the Start Art journal, artist Margaret Nagawa, who is also the pioneering person in the effort to revamp Start Art Journal, suggested to me to develop a short narrative essay talking about my role as Curatorial Assistant in the 2016 Kampala Art Biennale.

Artwork critiques, Featured, Review »

[13 Dec 2016 | Comments Off on ‘Dads’ – Report on Dads photography exhibition at the National Theatre | ]
‘Dads’ – Report on Dads photography exhibition at the National Theatre

By Philip Balimunsi. This article summaries the experience of audiences to the Dads exhibition and their general response collected through comments. Further still the article seeks to analyse the exhibition development process and the reaction of viewers in relation to the topic of positive masculinity. Providing a platform to future festival visual conversations, the photography exhibition idea was developed between Bayimba International Festival of the arts and the Swedish Embassy in Kampala to contribute to the greater festival conversation of 2016.

Featured, New media, Review »

[14 Oct 2015 | Comments Off on Glass mirrors Stacey Gillian’s triumphs and despair | ]
Glass mirrors Stacey Gillian’s triumphs and despair

By Samuel Kiwanuka

The Kampala contemporary art scene is increasingly becoming exciting. Artists’ niche to experiment and innovate with new media now facilitates them to convey different forms of visual narratives to their audiences through interaction with the artwork. By building installations in public space created from glass and mixed media, Stacey Gillian conjures a visual discourse that is both personal and intimate. The soft spoken artist’s works evolve around her personal experience of joy, triumph, pain and despair. She’s also […]

Creative techniques, Featured, Review, Visual Art »

[11 Aug 2015 | Comments Off on Stimulating artistic inquiry with Ronex’ Bags | ]
Stimulating artistic inquiry with Ronex’ Bags

The Exhibition titled Bags that opened recently at Afriart gallery in Kampala is a continuation of the innovation, participation and interaction. The artist showcases bags in both small and big sizes with artworks emblazoned on their faces. Some of the images are abstract while others are semi-abstract with human figures and familiar motifs like the pair of fish wedged on canvas, the miniature human face parallel to the miniature standing human figure and the now popular KLA motif.

Featured, Review, Uncategorized »

[29 Jul 2015 | Comments Off on Constructions Exhibition bridges gap between Artists and Artisans | ]
Constructions Exhibition bridges gap between Artists and Artisans

Constructions, is bound into community practice and collaboration within a framework of socially engaged and participatory art and temporary practice. The culmination is a hybrid between exhibition, public installation and event created to reflect everyday contexts.

Featured, Goethe Zentrum Kampala, Review, Uncategorized »

[21 Jul 2015 | Comments Off on How a single street leads us to the future | ]
How a single street leads us to the future

This year’s LaBa! celebrating its 9th year aimed to create visions for the future reflecting on the past and the present. Can such a complex process of creation be done during a festival?

Featured, Review, Uncategorized »

[14 Jul 2015 | Comments Off on Rampant Contemporary Kampala is Komakech’s playful performance in sculpture | ]
Rampant Contemporary Kampala is Komakech’s playful performance in sculpture

Rampant implies something wild and unchecked, without restrain. It is often used to describe something unwelcome. Rampant Contemporary Kampala is not an aimed criticism at the unchecked growth of Kampala city; it is more of a series of impressions about the city.

Featured, Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts, Review, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[18 Feb 2015 | 2 Comments | ]
Atwork in progress

From February 9th to the 13th 2015, 21 fine art students, curators-to-be, and recent graduates participated in the AtWork workshop, equipped with two small moleskine notebooks. One book was reserved for ideas, question, and notes and the second for executing their interpretation to the question, “should I take off my shoes?” They worked under the direction of Simon Njami, with the support of Dr. Lillian Nabulime and Dr. George Kyeyune from the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts.

Featured, Review, Visual Art »

[11 Feb 2015 | Comments Off on Totems of Uganda: A tribute to Ganda culture | ]
Totems of Uganda: A tribute to Ganda culture

A creation of Taga F. Nuwagaba and co-written by Nathan Kiwere, Totems of Uganda is a full-colour illustrated book with totemic species and accompanying stories of the same. The book captures Central Uganda’s cultural history and translates all totems in over seven languages. It links the totems with their visual representations so that they can be widely identified, especially by the younger generation.