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[1 Apr 2015 | Comments Off on Art writing encourages dialogue in the Arts | ]
Art writing encourages dialogue in the Arts

Last year in March, 32°East, a centre for contemporary arts in Uganda run a art writing residence for three months at their premises in Kansanga. The program co-sponsored by the British Council and Startjournal.org had one art writer, Dominic Muwanguzi, researching and producing articles that were published in the online journal.
Based from his experience from the residency, Muwanguzi a seasoned art journalist working in Kampala became more confident in his writing. For once, he became aware of the relationship that exists between writer, artist and audience.

Featured, Issue 040 Gender & Sexuality, Literature, Special analysis »

[19 May 2014 | Comments Off on Telling our Stories – A review of Invisible: Stories from Kenya’s Queer Community | ]
Telling our Stories – A review of Invisible: Stories from Kenya’s Queer Community

By: Kampire Bahana

This petite and easy read is a testament to the importance of telling our own stories. We usually talk about this in reference to being African; outsiders have been telling our stories since before the days of Heart of Darkness, a book published more than a hundred years ago that continues to define the continent in the minds of many. Today we have movie stars like George Clooney, Angelina Jolie and Ben Affleck, testifying in front of American […]

Featured, Issue 036 Sep-Oct '13, Literature »

[22 Sep 2013 | 6 Comments | ]
Derek Lubangakene: The Only Ugandan on the 2013 Golden Baobab Prizes Longlist

When the 2013 Golden Baobab Prizes longlist was announced over two weeks ago, we were curious to see how many of the writers would be from Uganda. The answer is one. Derek Lubangakene is on the longlist for the Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Books for his story Of Ghosts and Grave-Robbers. By Nanama B. Acheampong.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Literature, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | 4 Comments | ]
Endnotes of Chapter Two

“What is art? What is culture? If you are able to define it, then you know you are in trouble. How does Arts writing come into the picture? There is a myth that it is about judging something from very good to very bad, but the criteria for evaluating artworks are multi-dimensional.” Editor Thomas Bjørnskau writes his farewell note, and hands over Start to a new team.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Literature, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | 4 Comments | ]
Half Man, Half Words

“If there is a truth to be admitted to, I will concede this one; it feels like truth, scabrous, incomplete and grudgingly accepted: being a writer is like going on being married. You arrive at a point in it where you no longer have the energy to learn to live with a new person and hold down your peregrinations.” An essay on writing by Ugandan writer AK Kaiza.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Literature, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | Comments Off on Why Write? | ]
Why Write?

“The doubts hound: Am I really good enough? Who am I to think I have new stories to tell and a new way to tell them? But I have to go on because I have an ego that feeds on words, mine and anyone else’s. I need to prove that I can do it. At the core though, I write in an attempt to make sense of this world. Who and what and why are we? Why do we do what we do, to ourselves and to one another? Why can’t we stop?” An essay on writing by Ugandan writer Doreen Baingana.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Literature, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | Comments Off on Art, that that……… | ]
Art, that that………

Samson Ssenkaaba aka Xenson graduated in 1999 from the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts, Makerere University majoring in graphic design and painting. Since then, his works have been shown in numerous exhibitions and fashion shows in Uganda and abroad. Read his poem ‘Art, that that…….’

Artwork critiques, Issue 032 May '13, Literature, Special analysis »

[30 Apr 2013 | Comments Off on Debunking the Chinua Achebe legacy | ]
Debunking the Chinua Achebe legacy

Unarguably he was one of the most-read writers from the African continent, selling more than 8 million copies. His book Things Fall Apart is the most widely read book in African literature and the most translated. While a whirlwind of tributes has poured in in the wake of Achebe’s death, we have been left to ponder his contributions to African literature and the literature body generally, and to see if he rightfully deserved the continent’s honor: The father of modern African literature. And while at it, also weigh the relevance of his work to the present generation.

Issue 031 Apr '13, Literature, Music, Special analysis »

[31 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
WAZO 9: Arts Education — Lovely or Essential?

Faisal Kiwewa, the Director of Bayimba Cultural Foundation, spoke on “Arts and Arts Education: Lovely or Essential?” on 12th March 2012 at The Hub in Kamwokya. It hinged on principles gleaned from Eliot W. Eisner’s The Arts and the Creation of Mind and the verve of Bayimba’s work with local artists.

Issue 029 Feb '13, Literature »

[30 Jan 2013 | Comments Off on My Uganda @50 by Kaigo Betty (2nd runner-up of Femrite @50 Writing Competition) | ]
My Uganda @50 by Kaigo Betty (2nd runner-up of Femrite @50 Writing Competition)

Startjournal hereby publish the 2nd runner-up of Femrite’s Writing Competition under the theme ‘My Uganda @50?. The short story ‘My Uganda @50’ is written by Kaigo Betty.

Artwork critiques, Issue 028 Jan '13, Literature »

[2 Jan 2013 | One Comment | ]
Museveni’s children and their splintered voices in ‘Broken Voices of the Revolution’

The Lantern Meet of Poets is made up of mostly university students who share one thing in common. They were born in the 1980’s—at the time when the National Resistance Army (NRA), now the National Resistance Movement (NRM), allegedly liberated this country from bad governance. During this first themed recital and performance, they sounded out their splintered voices from within the revolution. The writing, though familiarly presented, managed to achieve a simmering hyper-realism in the audience.

Issue 028 Jan '13, Literature »

[2 Jan 2013 | One Comment | ]
Dependence by Muriel Baguma (1st runner-up of Femrite @50 Writing Competition)

Startjournal hereby publish the 1st runner-up of Femrite’s Writing Competition under the theme ‘My Uganda @50?. The short story ‘Dependence’ is written by Muriel Baguma.

Issue 027 Dec '12, Literature »

[30 Nov 2012 | One Comment | ]
A-fiftieth at Fifty by Linda Lilian (Winner of Femrite @50 Writing Competition)

Startjournal hereby publish the 1st winner of Femrite’s Writing Competition under the theme ‘My Uganda @50’. The short story ‘A-fiftieth at Fifty’ is written by Linda Lilian.

Artwork critiques, Issue 023 Aug '12, Literature »

[4 Aug 2012 | Comments Off on The Ugandan Paradox: A rich country of poor people | ]
The Ugandan Paradox: A rich country of poor people

Joachim Buwembo claims that he wrote The Ugandan Paradox to be able take part in the bonanza of cash squandering sure to ensue as government heads the celebrations of Uganda marking 50 years of Independence. In this book review, Iwaya Mataachi concludes that “The Ugandan Paradox is about a Uganda in decay, with a hero scarcity. All the people Joachim Buwembo meets know something is going wrong, and Buwembo himself understands this more than others.”

Artist interviews, Issue 023 Aug '12, Literature »

[4 Aug 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
Nii Ayikwei Parkes: Poets must learn editing and performing

For poetry lovers and those who wish to improve in both their writings and performances, African Writers Trust provided an opportunity to interact with one of Africa’s leading poets. The Ghanian poet Nii Ayikwei Parkes visited Uganda and shared his knowledge with the locals.

Artwork critiques, Issue 022 July '12, Literature »

[2 Jul 2012 | 3 Comments | ]
Summoning the Rains: African women on patriarchy

Summoning the Rains is a collection of short stories by ethnically diverse African women, published by Femrite after their 3rd Writers’ Residency. In this review, Serubiri Moses wishes to explore the representations of women and young girls in the book and relate these images to social and political paradigms, both current and past.

Creative techniques, Issue 022 July '12, Literature, Special analysis »

[2 Jul 2012 | 6 Comments | ]
Can a writer earn a living in Uganda?

Can a writer earn a living in Uganda? Who is a writer anyway? Does a journalist qualify as a writer? Iwaya Mataachi has interviewed Ugandan writers Beverley Nambozo, Jackee Batanda, Akiyo Michael Kasaija, Joachim Buwembo, and Beatrice Lamwaka to find out.

Artwork critiques, Issue 020 May '12, Literature »

[30 Apr 2012 | 2 Comments | ]
The Lure of Poetry

At an evening of poetry to commemorate the month long US celebration of the Black History Month in February at the Makerere University Institute of Technology, poetry took on a new meaning, that of being a mouth piece for social change. Elizabeth Namakula reviews this event and also looks at the Lantern Meet of Poets at the National Theatre March 17th.

Artwork critiques, Issue 016 Jan '12, Literature »

[19 Dec 2011 | Comments Off on A Writers’ Residency bearing fruits | ]
A Writers’ Residency bearing fruits

This writers’ residency, organised by Femrite (Uganda Women Writers Association) in partnership with The Swedish Institute, is the first of its kind in Uganda. On the whole, it has been a successful endeavour. For the year 2010 it was held in Jinja. It attracted participants from Ghana, South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania, Kenya, Zambia, and of course Uganda. The fruits from the 2010-series are documented in a publication by Femrite: ”World of Our Own”. This short story collection was launched on November 24th 2011. Lillian A. Aujo reviews.

Issue 015 Dec '11, Literature »

[29 Nov 2011 | Comments Off on Women’s Voices: A discussion on English literature in Uganda | ]
Women’s Voices: A discussion on English literature in Uganda

“When women’s writing talks about sexuality, its accomplishment is twofold: it works at breaking down the silence around sexual taboos, as well as revealing ways in which women both lack and execute power within sexual and gendered experiences.” Canadian Jessica Veaudry has reviewed the Ugandan novels “The Official Wife”, “Cassandra”, and “Memoirs of a Mother”.