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Articles in the Music Category

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[30 Apr 2014 | Comments Off on Bayimba – Gulu | ]
Bayimba – Gulu

Bayimba Gulu was dynamic and full of culture. Raymond Omerio Ojakol was there to cover it.

Featured, Issue 039 Inspiration, Music »

[1 Apr 2014 | One Comment | ]
Uganda Recordings

Ugandan Recordings is a Scandal Studios project to uncover and document music from northern Uganda. The search has found artists with a variety of instruments such as adungu, lukeme, nang’a, bila and orak. All recorded songs are accompanied by video clips, so one can see how each artist creates their work.

Dance and Theatre, Issue 037 Nov '13, Music »

[12 Nov 2013 | 2 Comments | ]
Mango Roses: A Review

Mango Roses is a recounting of Uganda’s troubled past weaved through the chaotic journey of two lead female character.

Featured, Issue 036 Sep-Oct '13, Music, Special analysis, Uncategorized »

[18 Sep 2013 | Comments Off on Rift Valley Festival 2013 | ]
Rift Valley Festival 2013

A platform like the Rift Valley Festival can be used to strategically develop ones career, but it is dependent on the vision of the musician. There is no point in going there to just collect contacts. One must follow up with emails or phone calls in order to develop relationships or explore future collaborations.

Issue 035 Aug '13, Music »

[7 Aug 2013 | One Comment | ]
Repackaging Gospel for the Mainstream

Indeed it seems that the music scene in Uganda is strangled by poor imitations of Dancehall and Reggae. But if we understand the history, the challenges and most importantly the gospel, there emerges soul-filled clarity.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Music, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | One Comment | ]
A Mind of Its Own

“When I have been surrounded by gracious courteous musicians, the stage has always been a space of incredible intimacy. Those times when I have played in the orchestra have once or twice felt as though I was being swept up by a thunderstorm. You watch the notes lift off the page as you play them; suddenly the world disappears around you.” An essay on music, love and jazz by Serubiri Moses.

Issue 034 Jul '13, Music, Opinions »

[1 Jul 2013 | One Comment | ]
Singing for the Heart

“Right now, with the growth of the creative industry globally and the culture of “bling” as perpetrated by mainstream artists, I think a lot of people think it’s a way to make fast money. It looks glamorous, being on stage, mingling with stars, having lots of money—which is a myth, there is always a price to be paid when signed to a major label—nice clothes, fast cars and beautiful men and women around you, but in fact it is a profession that takes a lot of commitment, practice and hard work.” An essay on singing by Ife Piankhi.

Artist interviews, Film, Issue 033 Jun '13, Music, Visual Art »

[30 May 2013 | One Comment | ]
Wazo 10: Xenson tells his story

On April 2nd 2013, the guest speaker for Wazo 10 was conceptual and visual artist, musician, filmmaker and poet, Ssenkaaba Samson, who goes by the name Xenson. In his introduction the moderator, David Kaiza, described Xenson as someone whose varied work in fashion, music, poetry and the visual arts has exponentially expanded what we call art and the art space in Uganda.

Issue 033 Jun '13, Music, Special analysis »

[30 May 2013 | 2 Comments | ]
Making contacts at Doa Doa and building music infrastructure

A great number of opportunities at DOA DOA in Jinja this month were snatched by musicians who had managers, PR agents, artist statements and CDs available — in short, professional musicians. This was further explained in a talk by Andrew Dabber about effective marketing. Serubiri Moses reports from DOA DOA.

Artwork critiques, Issue 033 Jun '13, Music »

[30 May 2013 | Comments Off on Bayimba Jinja: Crowd-pullers wanted | ]
Bayimba Jinja: Crowd-pullers wanted

There was that general feeling that the Bayimba Festival in Jinja had not been advertised enough, hence the slow attendance of people. Festivals are supposed to give you that sense of excitement and belonging. It’s hard to get that with a scanty number of people. That aside, the sound of music of its own is bound to bring you numbers since the event was in a public space and considering that shs 1000 is not a lot to pay. On this occasion, there was something missing in the music acts that performed. This festival needed at least one or two big names that are certain crowd-pullers to uplift the mood of the festival.

Issue 032 May '13, Music, Special analysis »

[30 Apr 2013 | 2 Comments | ]
“His Skin Lost Its Soup” | A Survey of Memory Loss

Kadongo Kamu is a musical subculture within Uganda which roots began in the 1950s with the guitarists Christopher Sebadduka and Elly Wamala. This article deals with how this culture has been subverted from mainstream culture through active technological and infrastructural modernization in Uganda from the 1960s till present.

Artwork critiques, Issue 032 May '13, Music »

[30 Apr 2013 | Comments Off on Playing with me or against me? | ]
Playing with me or against me?

A recent percussion show at the Sheraton Lion Bar collected Kampala’s most sought-after drummers and tried to incorporate the element of hip-hop. But what did it mean for the beatboxers and rappers, who were simply asked to show up even without a soundcheck? Serubiri Moses asks.

Issue 031 Apr '13, Music, Special analysis »

[31 Mar 2013 | 2 Comments | ]
Producing Culture on Twitter: Is it Ugandan?

From the exposure many Ugandan musicians such as Navio, The Mith, Keko, Lillian Mbabazi and Maurice Kirya are receiving on Twitter, it would not be inappropriate to say that popular Ugandan music is experiencing a boom in Africa. Unfortunately, this has exposed their largely Western aspirations, creating the daunting questions such as: Who is the audience on Twitter? Which culture does one produce for? And, is it possible to produce a cultural following on Twitter?

Artist interviews, Issue 031 Apr '13, Music »

[31 Mar 2013 | 2 Comments | ]
St. Nelly-sade: Luga-flo lyricist, emcee, poet and thinker

“When I listen to the latest album of St. Nelly-sade, I can’t stop but muse that, by and by, future hip-hop critiques, collectors, practitioners, etc will reflect upon his music as a one of a kind archetype, and use it to school and inspire the coming hip-hop generations in Uganda.” Lutakome ‘Felix’ Fidelis has met the Ugandan underground rapper.

Issue 031 Apr '13, Literature, Music, Special analysis »

[31 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
WAZO 9: Arts Education — Lovely or Essential?

Faisal Kiwewa, the Director of Bayimba Cultural Foundation, spoke on “Arts and Arts Education: Lovely or Essential?” on 12th March 2012 at The Hub in Kamwokya. It hinged on principles gleaned from Eliot W. Eisner’s The Arts and the Creation of Mind and the verve of Bayimba’s work with local artists.

Artwork critiques, Issue 031 Apr '13, Music, Visual Art »

[31 Mar 2013 | Comments Off on The International Women’s day Festival | ]
The International Women’s day Festival

On March 8th, one couldn’t help but wonder how art would be used to celebrate such an interesting phenomenon of the human race. Would it call for a sculpture of the woman in all her glory, a painting of her most-prized assets? Or how she embraces art in her day-to-day life to make it comfortable for herself and her loved ones? Certainly for the international celebrations of the Women’s day at the Sheraton, the answer lay in this last one. The theme of the festival was how independent is the Ugandan Woman? A retrospect of the past 50 years, present and future perspectives.

Artist interviews, Issue 030 Mar '13, Music, Special analysis »

[1 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
A Ugandan MC’s intimate keyboard hip-hop

Does hip-hop belong to Africa? And how has American rap music itself embraced Africa in its lyrics and metaphors? Serubiri Moses reflects on these questions, while at the same time tells the gripping story about Ugandan rapper Cyno MC’s, about his life-threatening heart surgery and how hip-hop helped him through it.

Artist interviews, Issue 030 Mar '13, Music, Special analysis »

[1 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
The influence of ancient drum practices on contemporary music

African societies, since time immemorial, have always been moved by the sound of the drum. Communication and celebration with percussions were norms within our numerous cultural contexts. Drums in African traditional societies were sources of identity that distinguished various social groupings. Samuel Lutaaya has interviewed Brian Magoba to learn how drums have been used in contemporary pop music compared to traditional music.

Art collectors, Dance and Theatre, Issue 029 Feb '13, Music, Special analysis »

[30 Jan 2013 | One Comment | ]
On Cultural Destiny: The Klaus Wachsmann Music Archive

(As a society), we are responsible for documenting, studying and understanding the musical heritage that is available. Many contemporary musicians are looking for avenues to make their work more authentic. … The Klaus Wachsmann Music Archive would be the perfect place to establish more accurate study by those same musicians who are searching for ‘authenticity’ to research on various instrument, and to hear recordings of the canons of master players in Uganda’s cultural legacy.

Artwork critiques, Issue 029 Feb '13, Music »

[30 Jan 2013 | Comments Off on Qwela’s Afrotopia album | ]
Qwela’s Afrotopia album

“What I like about Afrotopia is the assertively used indigenous instruments like the akogo, the nanga and the tube fiddle. When I compare Afrotopia, though, to another Ugandan album; Sipping From the River Nile by Tshila from 2008; it falls short. In this album by Tshila, being very similar in style to Afrotopia, the wealth of syncopation, rhythm and sound is consistent within every individual song. This quality is especially lacking in Afrotopia.” Pamela Acaye reviews.