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Articles tagged with: Daudi Karungi

Dr. George Kyeyune, Editorial Notes, Headline »

[14 Dec 2016 | One Comment | ]
Editorial: Start Journal Re-imagined

By Assoc. Prof. George Kyeyune
Start Journal of Arts and Culture is coming back after a break of almost a year. The break was necessary for its internal adjustment and re-organisation to set it on a new footing. It now has a new editorial team that constitutes high profile Africanists: Prof. Sidney Littlefield Kasfir, Assoc. Prof. George Kyeyune, Dr. Angelo Kakande and Ms. Margaret Nagawa.

Art Education, Featured, Opinions, Photography, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[14 Dec 2016 | 2 Comments | ]
Kampala Art Biennale – Photo essay by Fiona Siegenthaler

The documentation and representation of an event is never objective but individual and biased. This is most apparent when you have the privilege of both, being a team member and an observer of a key art event like the Kampala Art Biennale. This is exactly the position I have: As a coordinator of the talks, I worked together with the small but highly engaged team on our aim to make the Kampala Art Biennale the best possible event and offer […]

Art Education, Artist interviews, Collaborative Art Project, Featured, Goethe Zentrum Kampala, Headline, New media, Special analysis, Uncategorized, Upcoming events »

[2 Dec 2015 | One Comment | ]
transFORM#1: A conversation with Afriart Gallery Art director Daudi Karungi

The transFORM #1 Contemporary Art Experience is happening this Saturday 5th December at a warehouse behind the Nakumatt in Bukoto. The event, which is organised in partnership with the Goethe Zentrum Kampala, is widely advertised in the media as an art experience with exhibition and after party with South African DJs. Startjournal met with the organiser Daudi Karungi to find out what was the rational behind the event.

Brief, Featured, Nagenda International Academy of Art and Design »

[4 Aug 2015 | Comments Off on Decolonizing Art Education on the Continent: Brief | ]
Decolonizing Art Education on the Continent: Brief

At the launch of Another Roadmap Africa Cluster, at Nagenda International Academy of Art and Design (NIAAD) on 25th July 2015, some of the panelists choose to address the audience in Luganda, a local language in Uganda. The initial impression on the invited guests that included academics, artists, art managers and writers was of confusion and awkwardness.

Art collectors, Artwork critiques, Featured, Uncategorized »

[24 Mar 2015 | Comments Off on Art collecting supports Art | ]
Art collecting supports Art

Uganda’s art collectors are famously business men, art managers, foreign expatriates and artists themselves. In the past five years, there has been a surge in the buying art because of an increased number of artists on the local art scene, an influx of art galleries and organizations opening around Kampala, heightened exposure to the global art market and last but not least, political stability.

32º East Writer in Residence, Featured, Issue 041 Public vs. Private, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[25 Jun 2014 | Comments Off on Finding Solace in the West | ]
Finding Solace in the West

As persistent pleas are made to artists to create art with local significance the artists are caught up in a web of conflicted interest. On the one hand, they want to break away from the mould of Western art history bestowed onto them by university art education.

Featured, Issue 038 Education, Special analysis »

[15 Jan 2014 | 4 Comments | ]
Beyond Tradition & Modernity: Contemporary Art in Uganda

From the start, Uganda’s contemporary visual arts were defined by the absence of their own ‘authentic’ tradition. Throughout the early twentieth century, Makerere University’s European directors sought either to stimulate a latent African-ness of their own imagining in the students, or to push them into the future via an exposure to foreign experiments in representation

Issue 031 Apr '13, Literature, Music, Special analysis »

[31 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
WAZO 9: Arts Education — Lovely or Essential?

Faisal Kiwewa, the Director of Bayimba Cultural Foundation, spoke on “Arts and Arts Education: Lovely or Essential?” on 12th March 2012 at The Hub in Kamwokya. It hinged on principles gleaned from Eliot W. Eisner’s The Arts and the Creation of Mind and the verve of Bayimba’s work with local artists.

Dance and Theatre, Issue 030 Mar '13, Opinions, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[1 Mar 2013 | 4 Comments | ]
Censorship and the Arts in Uganda

“As the eighth edition of the Wazo Talking Arts proved, while the expectation is of artists to be at the forefront of debate and to challenge the status quo, artists are also a product of their culture, religion, and politics; their work cannot be separated from their experience. In other words artists are human beings, artists can be frightened, and artists can be ideologically conservative or liberal. If there is one attribute that artists need to create meaningful, challenging, even great work in the face of possible censorship, then that attribute is courage.” Farida Nabalozi reflects on Censorship and the Arts in Uganda.

Art collectors, Issue 030 Mar '13, Visual Art »

[1 Mar 2013 | One Comment | ]
The Collection Bug

As the global economy goes through turbulent times, it is becoming clear that art is regarded as one of the few investments which people regard as a safe bet. But, there’s more to art than money, despite the relationship the two are often seen as having. Local art collections and sales are on the rise, and with an increasing population of young, upwardly-mobile people looking to culture as a hobby, Anna Kućma sets out to discover the motivations driving several local collectors.

Artwork critiques, Issue 028 Jan '13, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[2 Jan 2013 | 4 Comments | ]
Nudity? It is Artistic Expression and Free Speech (part III)

In this third and final part of a three-part essay, Angelo Kakende reviews the recent Nude 2012-exhibition at FasFas: “Nudes 2012 was different from Nude 2000, Nude 2001… It was mobilised with local resources and initiatives. This created the burden of the need to sell and recover costs. In my opinion, it is this economic incentive which affected the positions the artists took while. They treaded carefully avoiding the risk of offending anyone.”

Issue 016 Jan '12, Opinions, Visual Art »

[28 Dec 2011 | 2 Comments | ]
East African Art Summit 2011: The coming together of creative minds

“The time has finally arrived that Africa begin to look to Africa for answers. We are starting to think about making East Africa our market place. But we can not go far without drastically improving the quality of our products. For too long we have made inefficient production schedules and products. On the other hand, a myriad of questions are raised to which answers cannot be immediately found. Still, these questions must be asked and answered if our art is to grow into the cultural void in which we find ourselves.” Ugandan visual artist SANE reflects on the East African Art Summit.

Artwork critiques, Issue 015 Dec '11, Visual Art »

[29 Nov 2011 | 20 Comments | ]
Kyeyune’s The Kampala I Will Always Come Back To: Sanitised Economic Injustices and the Risk of Propaganda

In this article Angelo Kakande shows and argues that as representations of life in Kampala, Kyeyune’s paintings are not portraits of individuals or groups. They are in the first place art. In the second, they are sanitised versions of reality intended to suit middle class and tourist aesthetic tastes. In the third place, they carry the risks of pandering to state propaganda.

Issue 013 Oct '11, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[2 Oct 2011 | 6 Comments | ]
Is the Ugandan art scene on the right path?

Kampala’s arts scene is on the move. There is no longer such a thing as “the only gallery in town”. These new white cubes appears in many shapes and frequencies, and provides great, new arenas for creators to meet potential buyers and patrons. But who are the new drivers behind the wheel? Startjournal takes a look at the spin-offs, the garden parties, the corporate fueled charity events and the festivals.

Artwork critiques, Issue 012 Sept '11, Visual Art »

[31 Aug 2011 | 3 Comments | ]
Taking art back to communities: The Mabarti Street Art project

The project of taking art to the street that Sadolin is spearheading will give artists and their ‘new audience’ the opportunity to dialogue. The artists will cast their nets beyond the gallery visitors to include local audiences. They will understand each other better and gradually develop images that match their expectations. Mabarti art project has confirmed to the Kampala dwellers and visitors that there is a community of artists in Uganda actively and devotedly practicing art and that these artists would like to reach out to them.

Artist interviews, Issue 012 Sept '11, Visual Art »

[31 Aug 2011 | 5 Comments | ]
A woman with many artistic hats: An interview with Margaret Nagawa

Margaret Nagawa has had many roles and responsibilities participating in Uganda’s fine art world. She has been a student of fine art, a maker of fine arts, a curator, a teacher, a promoter, and a collector of fine arts. And now again, a student of fine arts! Margaret currently lives in Ethiopia but is working on her PhD from Makerere, writing her dissertation on ‘Visual Arts Dissemination and Cultural Translation in East Africa’.

Issue 010 June '11, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[1 Jun 2011 | 4 Comments | ]
David Oduki at ‘Let Us Share Beauty’: “Adapt exhibitions to global trends”

David Oduki, the co-founder of Royal African Foundation, attended the opening of the exhibition “Let Us Share Beauty” in Utrecht, the Netherlands. “Local galleries in Uganda should be aware of global trends and adapt exhibitions to those trends. They also should promote the likes of Collin Sekajugo and explain their recycling message to the local public,” David Oduki tells Startjournal.

Artwork critiques, Issue 008 Apr '11, Visual Art »

[31 Mar 2011 | 2 Comments | ]
Beyond the Controversy

Testament to the strength and innovation of Uganda’s artistic community, the Controversial Art Exhibition at Kampala’s Afriart Gallery sought to challenge traditional perceptions of African art. Henry Mzili Mujunga’s catalogue text, Finding the Controversy, offers an insight into the premises of this exhibition. Here he boldly exclaims that the work of “the true heroes of Ugandan art” could be found in this small, yet adventurous display. And he was right.

Issue 004 Dec ´09, Special analysis, Visual Art »

[1 Dec 2009 | One Comment | ]
Viral Value: A chat with the curator of the Dutch Masters Today exhibition

Henry Mzili Mujunga chats with the curator of the Dutch Masters Today exhibition at the Uganda Museum and ponders how to start an “art epidemic”.

The Dutch masters are here. Who’s excited? Is it Rembrandt or Van Gogh? Are Corneille Van Beverloo, Karel Appel and Peter Deim really present in Uganda? If you are not a student of art or an art enthusiast, you haven’t a clue about what I am talking.

Art collectors, Issue 004 Dec ´09, Visual Art »

[1 Dec 2009 | Comments Off on Pamela Kertland Wright: Collector, writer and owner of Emin Pasha hotel | ]
Pamela Kertland Wright: Collector, writer and owner of Emin Pasha hotel

A Q&A with Pamela Kertland Wright, collector, writer and owner of Emin Pasha hotel as well as several other safari lodges in Uganda.

“I think there is incredible talent here in Uganda. But sometimes it needs to be taken out of Uganda to be fully appreciated. When people visit our house in the UK and see the art we have there, they are amazed. We have been buying pieces for people overseas, who seem to appreciate the work more than […]